Annuals

Annuals

Cuphea

CupheaLatin Name: Cuphea hyssopifolia
Height: 1.00 to 2.00 feet
Width: 0.75 to 2.50 feet
Light: Full sun
Water: Average
Soil: Well Drained
Description: It produces quaint, small, trumpet-shaped flowers with six spreading lavender petals and green calyx tubes. Flowers appear singly in the leaf axils along stems crowded with lance-shaped glossy green leaves (to 3/4” long). Blooms profusely summer to frost. Although heather-like in appearance, this plant is not a member of the heather family, hence the sometimes used common name of false heather. Some white- and pink-flowered cultivars are available. Flowers are attractive to hummingbirds and butterflies.

Annuals

Geranium Regal {Martha Washington}

Geranium Regal {Martha Washington}Latin Name: Pelargonium x domesticum
Height: 1.00 to 3.00 feet
Width: 1.00 to 2.00 feet
Light: Full sun to part shade
Water: Average
Soil: Well Drained
Description: Regal or Martha Washington geraniums are a loose grouping of hybrid geraniums involving P. grandiflorum and P. cucullatum. They typically grow to 3’ tall on somewhat woody stems and feature rounded heart-shaped to kidney-shaped medium green leaves that have irregular teeth and crinkled margins. Showy flowers in shades of pink, purple, lavender and red, often speckled with interesting markings and splotches, are borne in clusters (umbels).

Annuals

Jasminum Nudiflorum

Jasminum NudiflorumLatin Name: Jasminum Nudiflorum
Height: 10.00 to 15.00 feet
Width: 3.00 to 6.00 feet
Light: Full sun to part shade
Water: Average
Soil: Well Drained
Description: Winter jasmine is a trailing, viny shrub that grows from a central crown. As a shrub, it typically grows in a sprawling mound to 4’ tall with arching branches, and spreads by trailing branches that root as they go along the ground. As a vine, it typically grows to 10-15’. Willowy green stems are attractive in winter. Non-fragrant, bright yellow flowers bloom along the stems in late winter before the leaves. Compound, trifoliolate, dark green leaves with ovate leaflets (to 1.25” long).

Annuals

Pansies

PansiesLatin Name: Viola x wittrockiana
Height: 4 – 8 inches
Width: 8 – 12 inches.
Light: Full sun to part shade
Water: Average
Soil: Well Drained
Description: From tiny, cheerful Johnny jump-ups to the stunning 3-inch blooms of Majestic Giant pansies, the genus Viola has a spectacular array of delightful plants for the spring garden. They’re must-haves to celebrate the first days of spring since they don’t mind cold weather and can even take a little snow and ice! They’re pretty planted in masses in the ground, but also cherished for the early color they bring to pots, window boxes, and other containers. By summer, pansies bloom less and their foliage starts to brown. It’s at this time that you’ll have to be tough and tear them out and replant with warm-season annuals, such as marigolds or petunias. But that’s part of their charm — they are an ephemeral celebration of spring!

Annuals

Portulaca

Portulaca Latin Name: Portulaca grandiflora
Height: 0.25 to 0.75 feet
Width: 0.50 to 1.00 feet
Light: Full sun
Water: Average
Soil: Well Drained

Annuals

Sweet Pea

Sweet Pea Latin Name: Lathyrus odoratus
Height: 3.00 to 8.00 feet
Width: 2.00 to 3.00 feet
Light: Full sun
Water: Average
Soil: Well Drained
Description: Annual Sweet Peas are often beautifully fragrant but last only one season, while Everlasting Sweet Peas are herbaceous perennials returning year after year but with less fragrance than their annual cousins.

Annuals

Cabbage/Kale

Cabbage/Kale Latin Name: Brassica oleracea
Height: 1.00 to 1.50 feet
Width: 1.00 to 1.50 feet
Light: Full sun
Water: Average
Soil: Well Drained
Description: Cold-hardy and resilient, kale is an easy member of the cabbage family to grow. You can set out plants quite early in spring as long as you protect the young plants from severe cold winds with a cover. They will grow steadily for months until the weather gets too warm. You’ll get a second chance to plant kale in the fall, when cool weather brings out a wonderfully sweet, nutty flavor that is unique to these cold-natured plants. Fall is the best time for growing kale in areas where winter doesn’t dip below the teens, or in a cold frame farther north, because the leaves are sweeter when they mature in cooler weather.